Posted tagged ‘Fedora’

Big Thanks To The SELinux Team

June 30, 2009

I started using Fedora back in the Fedora 8 days.  I’ve always tried to run SELinux in enforcing mode and back in the Fedora 8-9 days that seemed to mean I’d have some SELinux issue every few days.  It wasn’t a big deal, but it was annoying and very tempting to turn it off completely.

Starting with Fedora 10, at least for me, the SELinux hiccups seemed to only happen every few weeks and I was very impressed with the improvement.

I’ve now been running Fedora 11 for three weeks and haven’t had a single SELinux issue at all.  Maybe I am unique, but from what I can tell SELinux with Fedora 11 no longer has any annoying issues while running in enforcing mode.

Thanks a lot SELinux team!  I now feel a great degree of security without a hint of discomfort.

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Innovation Sparks Jealousy

March 26, 2009

(Full disclosure: I use, and contribute, to both Fedora and Ubuntu)

I’m finding increased jealousy toward Fedora every day especially when someone points out how well Fedora is innovating.

Case and point, take this article I just read Ubuntu 9.04 vs Fedora 11: A lot can change in one month! The article concludes:

Ubuntu, as usual, has been rock stable for me…

But considering the differences – Fedora 11 seems to be a full 6 months ahead of Ubuntu….

Ubuntu sure has some catching up to do. When Ubuntu 9.10 releases, I can’t even begin to imagine how far ahead Fedora 12 will be!

Now look at the comments:
First, take Inconsiderate Clod:

Fedora is a (stupidly) aggressive development distro which regularly causes major malfunctions to all it’s rawhide users as well as it’s more ‘conservative’ users…  the world should be happy and thankful with all the Fedora users who unwittingly offer themselves up to be ginny pigs for the greater good of FOSS.

Ouch! I guess I am an unwitting Fedora Ginnie pig. Do I hear a little jealousy?

Or maybe RALF:

You sir, are an idiot.

Firefox 3.1 isn’t stable yet. OpenOffice 3.1 isn’t stable yet. Plymouth only works with Intel hardware, Ubuntu too will use gnome-media, Thunderbird 3 isn’t stable yet.

Double standard RALF? Ubuntu releases their LTS release with with Firefox Beta and RALF is complaining that a Fedora Alpha release has some Beta software? Interesting.  Not to mention the incorrect statement about Plymouth coming from someone calling another an idiot.  I found this amusing.

The development of each Ubuntu version lasts 6 months. In those months, they lock down the version and keep fighting bugs until the deadline.

Because, Fedora doesn’t try to fight bugs until their deadline?

That’s why people can actually _use_ Ubuntu. Fedora is more like ‘what’s next?’

Again, by Canonical’s versus Fedora’s own numbers, more people use Fedora then Ubuntu, so this “usability” argument is a little weak.

Personally, I think both Canonical and Fedora deserve praise, not attacks due to jealousy. Canonical has brought Linux to millions of users who arguably needed something like Ubuntu to get started. Likewise, Fedora’s innovation always keeps it a good 6 months ahead of the pack without the luxury of having an upstream distro do the majority of the heavy lifting. For these reasons we need to have more praise and less jealousy.

Another 100,000+ week for Fedora 10

March 10, 2009

Fedora 10 has been gaining new users at impressive rates.  This past week alone Fedora 10 has picked up over 100,000 more.  This puts the total number of Fedora users somewhere around 12-13 million, higher than any other Linux distribution. (If you disagree, please direct me to numbers.)  At last count, Fedora 10 has a 15% gain in users over Fedora 9.  This measurement was taken before this impressive week so the total gain might even be more than that.

Why is this?  I can think of at least 3 reasons:

1. An unparallelled commitment to innovation: While some communities have adopted ‘feature stagnation’ as their method of innovation, Fedora has been relentless in bringing new features to the Linux forefront.  I have already blogged about how Fedora 11 may possibly be the most innovative Linux release ever.  And, like always, these features are the kind that other distros get very excited about adopting.  This is the ultimate acknowledgment that your feature set is full of great ideas.

2.  Increased quality of release: Paul Frields recently articulated how release quality has become a major goal of the Fedora project.    Fedora has shown it is possible to be a very innovative Linux distribution while at the same time giving users a solid experience. To quote the media: “The best thing of all [these features] is that they all work smoothly and seamlessly together. Fedora 10 is what a cutting edge Linux distribution should be. You don’t have to take my word for it. You can download this free community Linux distribution today from the Fedora download site. ”

3. Fantastic community:   Fedora’s commitment to community can be seen at all levels.  In time where many companies are distributing layoffs Red Hat continues to hire established community leaders, projects like fedora-community and the Mokhsa are in full force, and new ambassadors are joining the project literally every day. (Statistically)  The Fedora Project not only produces great software, but has built a community people are excited to be a part of.  That makes a difference.

Fedora 11 Will Have An Incredible Number Of New Features

February 28, 2009

Fedora 10, an amazing Fedora release in its own right, had 28 approved features. Fedora 9 had 30 and Fedora 8 had 21.

As of writing this Fedora 11 has 51 which have already been approved, plus another 9 waiting to be approved any day now. That means in the end there should be ~60 approved features which make it into Fedora 11! This doesn’t even count the work going into external things such as overhauling the documentation or the community work going into the Moksha project.

The features on the list aren’t trivial either, take a look. Almost every aspect of the OS is having some substantial work going into it.  You name it, boot time, instant messaging, delta RPMs, 64 bit kernel in 32 bit system, the media player, networking, security, KMS for nearly all open source drivers, compilers, etc.. will be seeing a lot of new love. (Much more than just upgrades) This list will have other distros playing catchup for some time to come.

So, show your appreciation by testing the new release.  It may be best to start with the upcoming beta to be released on March 24, so mark your calendars.  Even better, in addition to testing sign up and become a part of the Fedora Project.  You won’t regret it, the community and innovation you will come across will never be matched anywhere.  Guaranteed. 🙂