Posted tagged ‘ubuntu’

Please Report Bugs Upstream

June 21, 2009

This applies to all Linux distributions, I am not trying in any way to pick on Ubuntu. They are just keeping statistics in a way I can put some numbers behind my rant.

Many were excited when Ubuntu announced they were going to fix at least one hundred little bugs called papercuts that will help improve the overall Linux experience.  Here is a simple suggestion that will also lead to at least 100 extra bugs fixed over the next six months:  Report your bugs upstream!

There are at least ~800 known bugs in Ubuntu where it is confirmed the bug is related to upstream but nobody has taken the time to notify upstream about it.   People triaging the bug reports say “this bug also effects upstream project X” but it is never actually reported to upstream.  I’m guessing that list would be over 1000 if all such bugs that have slipped through the cracks were accounted for.

Now, assuming each  major Linux distribution has hundreds of bugs where the bug triager knows it is an issue with upstream but fails to report it, if all these bugs would get reported I am sure an extra 100 bugs will get fixed over the next six months because of simple things like this.

The developers behind the major Linux distributions are great, but more bugs will get fixed if upstream is involved.  Now, “to put my money where my mouth is”, I spent several hours this weekend submitting some if these bugs upstream.  I’m sure I didn’t do a perfect job, but at least upstream now knows about these bugs and some have already been confirmed by upstream and work has begun fixing them.  It was that easy.

So there you go. There’s my formula to get an extra 100 bugs fixed over the next six months.  It is as simple as: Report your bugs upstream!

Advertisements

Ubuntu: I Hope AppStore Rumor True

May 26, 2009

Ubuntu is currently having their semi-annual developer summit and will be discussing their new AppCenter tomorrow.  There is a rumor/total guess that this AppCenter will also integrate with an Ubuntu AppStore secretly in development.

I honestly hope this rumor/total guess is true.  There is a large demographic of people who would be benefited by this.  This would help Linux adoption among such people.  Second, it would be a great source of revenue for Canonical which would also be great for Ubuntu.

Not that my vote matters to anyone, but I hope it happens.

Comment For Mark’s “Meta-cycles” post

April 17, 2009

I left this as a comment on Mark Shuttleworth’s recent blog post.  I am only posting it here because I was told it was removed as spam.  Perhaps too long?  Anyways, I hope Mark can see it now.

Mark,

I always enjoy your blog posts. This is my unifying philosophy:

1. 6 Month Cycles: These are best for getting the best of free software out quickly for immediate testing and or contributor feedback.  This is the release that should be based on energizing your contributor community. I honestly don’t think the 6-month release can ever become the bedrock of mainstream use. Here you need to have the “release early, release often” mentality.

2. LTS Cycle: This is best for providing a “final” product which the mainstream world can build upon and rapidly support and promote. This release is best for users who do not care about the latest new features in Linux, just want something that works well. Here you need the “release when it’s ready” mentality. (Though I would confine yourself to a 2-3 year window so you don’t pull a Perl 6.)

I think releasing alongside Debian is a very smart move. You really would be shooting your developers in the foot by taking away a great opportunity to collaborate with Debian and share code.

Also, I’m interested in your new UI ideas, but frankly they seem to be trickling in very slowly. (Only notifications). This isn’t trying to be a criticism, it just seems this UI work takes time to do it properly and having it all rock hard stable in a year, where the majority hasn’t even started to be tested I think is a stretch.

Lastly, Gnome 3.0 may not be the best release to base an LTS on. There may be some small “KDE 4.0” effects that would be nice to have an extra 6 months to iron out. Your end users would like to have a polished Gnome 3.X version.

So, again, I like your post and applaud your idea to move the LTS back to 10.10. That is when I believe it will “be ready”.

Innovation Sparks Jealousy

March 26, 2009

(Full disclosure: I use, and contribute, to both Fedora and Ubuntu)

I’m finding increased jealousy toward Fedora every day especially when someone points out how well Fedora is innovating.

Case and point, take this article I just read Ubuntu 9.04 vs Fedora 11: A lot can change in one month! The article concludes:

Ubuntu, as usual, has been rock stable for me…

But considering the differences – Fedora 11 seems to be a full 6 months ahead of Ubuntu….

Ubuntu sure has some catching up to do. When Ubuntu 9.10 releases, I can’t even begin to imagine how far ahead Fedora 12 will be!

Now look at the comments:
First, take Inconsiderate Clod:

Fedora is a (stupidly) aggressive development distro which regularly causes major malfunctions to all it’s rawhide users as well as it’s more ‘conservative’ users…  the world should be happy and thankful with all the Fedora users who unwittingly offer themselves up to be ginny pigs for the greater good of FOSS.

Ouch! I guess I am an unwitting Fedora Ginnie pig. Do I hear a little jealousy?

Or maybe RALF:

You sir, are an idiot.

Firefox 3.1 isn’t stable yet. OpenOffice 3.1 isn’t stable yet. Plymouth only works with Intel hardware, Ubuntu too will use gnome-media, Thunderbird 3 isn’t stable yet.

Double standard RALF? Ubuntu releases their LTS release with with Firefox Beta and RALF is complaining that a Fedora Alpha release has some Beta software? Interesting.  Not to mention the incorrect statement about Plymouth coming from someone calling another an idiot.  I found this amusing.

The development of each Ubuntu version lasts 6 months. In those months, they lock down the version and keep fighting bugs until the deadline.

Because, Fedora doesn’t try to fight bugs until their deadline?

That’s why people can actually _use_ Ubuntu. Fedora is more like ‘what’s next?’

Again, by Canonical’s versus Fedora’s own numbers, more people use Fedora then Ubuntu, so this “usability” argument is a little weak.

Personally, I think both Canonical and Fedora deserve praise, not attacks due to jealousy. Canonical has brought Linux to millions of users who arguably needed something like Ubuntu to get started. Likewise, Fedora’s innovation always keeps it a good 6 months ahead of the pack without the luxury of having an upstream distro do the majority of the heavy lifting. For these reasons we need to have more praise and less jealousy.